Posts Tagged ‘Randy’

SBD FLW

Sunday, March 16th, 2014

Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio. Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America

image

Quartlery Newsletter

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

Working on a quarterly newsletter for Harmony EyeCare. They’re wanting to provide a consistent and convenient way to keep in touch with patients. I’m thinking the header will always have some sort of object on the right side, whether it be glasses or contact lens cases or an instrument the Doctor would like to feature that quarter.

Full size portion of header:

Quarterly Newsletter

Each quarter they’ll be able to feature a main article at the top (In this case, an introduction from the Optometrist). A number of secondary articles may appear below accompanied by an image (vector graphics by me, or real photography) to the left.

We decided MailChimp was the best service for their needs. They’ll be able to analyze the basics, like how many people opened the newsletter and how many links were clicked. A big plus for me, though, is that MailChimp automatically writes CSS inline to make sure their newsletter looks similar in any mail client (Gmail being the toughest to design for).

Width: 650px
Font: Helvetica (or Arial, sorry Windows users) with Georgia Italic for the tagline
First Issue: January 2011
Newsletter Service: MailChimp

Here is more of the newsletter:

Quarterly Newsletter

Sill working on the layout a bit and proper graphics to match the text.

- Randy

Postcards For Harmony EyeCare

Sunday, June 27th, 2010

Working hard this week on a few postcards and website bits for Harmony EyeCare. The doctor requested a set of postcards to remind current patients that they can order contacts on the site.

Updated on 07/10/2010 with final design.

Front:
harmony eyecare postcard front

Back:
harmony eyecare postcard back

Might put another contact lens case design into the pattern. We’ll see. The website currently has a callout for ordering contacts in the left column below the main navigation (see www.harmonyeyecare.com). After approval of this concept the callout will need to match the postcard for a proper connection between the two. And probably needs to be moved to the header. Gotta keep things consistent.

Another postcard will go out soon reminding patients of their next check-up. I’ll be using a similar pattern as this one but with other elements dealing with eye exams. Update coming soon after feedback from client. Updated with images below.

Front:
checkup-reminder-front

Back:
checkup-reminder-back

- Randy

August: Version 2

Saturday, January 9th, 2010

In my earlier post I talked about version 1. After much research I began to work on version 2. So far the uppercase alphabet is in rough draft. Currently working on lowercase and numbers. In the meantime I am getting some professional feedback on the uppercase.

Here is rough version 2:
augustv2

A few of the many changes include:
1. 20% wider
2. Thin strokes were thickened
3. Serifs extend left and right on most glyphs
4. Height of crossbars were lowered
5. Any round letter sits just below baseline

Sample words:
august1

august2

august3

Sample header/body text:
august4

Lowercase coming soon.

- Randy

6 Panel Book From Graphic Design 1

Sunday, November 29th, 2009

I believe this was the last project from my Graphic Design 1 class back in the Community College days. I was young, naive, and knew pretty much nothing about typography. I think Goudy Stout was my favorite font at the time, but I’ve since matured.

Anyway, here are the details:
1. No computers! Couldn’t touch em during the semester.
2. Use two different magazines to combine an image with text.
3. 6 square panels including cover.
4. Black and white only.
5. Only tools were photocopier, xacto knife, and rubber cement.

My best guess is that each individual panel needs to convey the message (in this case, love) as well as when all six are combined. I’ll be the first to admit my craftsmanship needed improvement. I was a freshman, give me a break!

The 6 panel book:
panelbookall

panelbook

panelbook1

panelbook3

panelbook4

panelbook5

panelbook6

- Randy

The Grid System Guide

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

What is this?

This is an ongoing guide to creating grid systems for print, which will be continually updated.

Introduction:

There are plenty of guides out now online about how to create grid systems for the web, even grid generators. But I’ve had trouble finding sufficient material online about creating grids for print. What I did find was a lot of vague terminology. Most of what I’ve learned about setting up the grid comes from this book: Grid Systems in Graphic Design, and Vignelli’s Canon. This guide is geared towards the designer who does not have access to the book, I can not thank you enough, Brockmann. This guide is just my way of constructing the grid, and should in no way serve as the only way.

Let’s Get Started:

I’m going to assume you have chosen an appropriate paper size and margins. I could go in depth about these two subjects but for now it’s better to stay as an assumption.

The grid is based on leading. Baseline to baseline of next line.

1. Start by placing a block of fully justified text from your top margin down to your bottom margin.

grid1

Page: 8×10 inches. Margins: top – 1/4, inside – 1/2, outside – 1/4, bottom – 1/2.

2. Choose a typeface, size, and leading. This will serve as your body copy. Please do not use the default leading. For example: 10pt sans-serif type has a default leading of 12pt. This is generally too tight and will be harder to read. I like to stay 3-4pts above the type size. So 10pt with 14pt leading is appropriate. If you choose a serif font you can get away with 3pts above type size.

Place a blue line under each baseline.

grid2

Typeface: Helvetica. Size: 10pt. Leading: 14pt.

3. Count the number of lines of text in your block. The point of the grid is to divide the page into even blocks of space vertically. Determining how many blocks of space varies from project to project. 12 is a good starting place. 12 can be divided into 6, 4, 3, or 2. Lets say you have counted 52 lines. Divide 52 by 12, we get 4.33. No good. We need to minus 4 lines of text. 48 divided by 12, we get 4. So at every 4th line of text we place a red line under the baseline.

grid3

Right now you have a block of text with 48 lines. Which is divided into 12 rows. If 12 rows seems too restrictive, divide in half to get 6 rows for more freedom.

4. Place a green line on top of each cap-height. All 48 lines. The green line will help align photos. Photos should always align with some grid line, whether it be cap-height or baseline, or be extended to the edge of the page. Do not align the bottom of a photo with the cap-height. (green lines)

grid4

5. Now for columns. The number of columns is essentially up to you and the information you are displaying. If you have a lot of tabular data, for example an annual report, 6 columns might be more appropriate than 2. Columns are divided evenly across the page, staying inside the margins of course.

Place a red vertical line to mark the columns.

grid5

Page divided into 6 columns.

We can’t stop here, though. There needs to be space between each column. We can’t have words or photos running into each other. The space is determined by the distance between a baseline and the cap-height of the next line.

grid6

Black bar represents distance between baseline and cap-height.

Now translate that into the space between columns.

grid7

6. Each row needs space as well. Bottom of photos can’t run into the top of another. Simply place a red line on the cap-height of the next line.

grid8

Page: 12 rows by 6 columns.

7. The grid is constructed. Now it’s time for the real fun. Playing around with many different layouts to find the right one. Here are some examples.

grid9

grid10

grid11

These are just a very few of what is possible in a matter of minutes. All represent the left page of a full spread. Please don’t hold these layouts against me. They were just quick mockups.

I will talk about page numbers later, and edit if anything is unclear. Stay tuned.